ShadyGardens Blog

March 31, 2009

Piedmont Azalea

Piedmont Azalea is definitely one of the loveliest blooming shrubs in the South. And the fact that it is a native plant means it should be planted in every southern garden (in my opinion!)

The Piedmont Azalea, Rhododendron canescens, is native to the Piedmont region of the Southeast, making it suitable for growing anywhere in Georgia.

The fragrant blooms can be anywhere from a vivid pink to a soft pink or even a pinkish white. Blooms appear in very early spring before the leaves on this deciduous shrub.

Although Piedmont Azalea naturally occurs in the warm southern United States, it is hardy to areas as cold as USDA Zone 5.

All azaleas prefer well-drained soil, so you should amend your soil with soil conditioner or composted bark to improve drainage if your soil is clay.

Native Azaleas are usually found growing in the woods but will bloom more profusely in full sun as long as water is adequate.

Bloom buds are formed in late summer and early fall, so pay close attention to watering during this time. When a native azalea fails to bloom, lack of water during bud formation is usually the culprit.

Native azaleas are drought tolerant once established, but water weekly the first year or two to make sure your plant gets a good start.

March 21, 2009

Red Buckeye – Native Plant for Hummingbirds

Filed under: Aesculus, buckeye, Callaway Gardens, dwarf, gardens, native, nursery, online, pavia, red, Shady, tree, woodland — shadygardens @ 2:47 pm


Dwarf Red Buckeye, Aesculus pavia, is one of the most showy native plants in our garden. Blooming very early in late winter or early spring, the large red panicle blooms are visible from a great distance, attracting hummingbirds as they return from their trip down south.

The Red Buckeye is among the first of the woodland plants to reawaken in spring, sending out tender new leaves as early as February. Lavish flowers appear early too, usually sometime in March for us.

The large luscious blooms attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and other pollinators to the early spring garden. The Red Buckeye begins blooming at a young age when only about 3 feet tall. Red panicle blooms are up to 6 inches long!

This deciduous tree is the perfect specimen for the edge of a woodland, offering a focal point to draw you into the garden. It is especially lovely when underplanted with early spring blooming wildflowers.

The palmately compound leaves are deep green and keep their attractive tropical look all season long.

Red Buckeye is very easy to grow. You will enjoy this lovely little tree in your woodland garden!

March 15, 2009

The Loss of a Pet

Filed under: chicken, chickens, illness, insect control, loss, pet, Skippy — shadygardens @ 2:33 pm

Many of you have visited us here at Shady Gardens and enjoyed meeting our chickens. Hearing the names of them usually brings a smile. We gave all our chickens names from our favorite TV show. You’re probably familiar with Barney, Thelma Lou, and the Fun Girls, Daphne and Skippy. (Andy was a terribly mean Rhode Island Red Rooster that we couldn’t keep here with small children! And Barney decided we should give away Gomer, because he didn’t want to share the girls with him.)

Several weeks ago we were saddened with the loss of Skippy after a lengthy illness. Skippy was a good chicken. Our chickens are really just pets. We eat the eggs but never the chickens.

Although Skippy was never much of an egg layer, she certainly did her part as a member of our Insect Control Team. Skippy was the only hen that would not put up with Barney’s foolishness (you know how roosters are!) We will certainly miss her.

The Loss of a Pet

Filed under: chickens, hen, insect control, pet, Shady Gardens Nursery, Skippy — shadygardens @ 2:17 pm

Many of you have visited us here at Shady Gardens and enjoyed meeting our chickens. Hearing the names of them usually brings a smile–Barney, Thelma Lou, and the Fun Girls, Daphne and Skippy. Several weeks ago we were saddened with the loss of Skippy after a lengthy illness. Skippy was a good chicken. Although she was never much of an egg layer, she certainly did her part as a member of our Insect Control Team. Skippy was the only hen that would not put up with Barney’s foolishness (you know how roosters are!) We will certainly miss her.

March 10, 2009

Shadygardener Selling Outside Ebay

Filed under: ebay, favorite seller, feedback, gardens, mail order, native, nursery, online, plant, plants, Shady, shadygardener — shadygardens @ 2:06 pm


One of the favorite sellers of plants on ebay is now selling on her own site outside of ebay! “AWESOME ITEM – VERY PLEASED WITH TOTAL TRANS. & HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS EBAYER!!!!” “The important thing is that the selections are unique & quality excellent!” “Shipment was fast and plant was better than expected, thanks!” “One of my favorite sellers. Beautiful healthy plants.” “Will buy from this seller again and again …” Those are just a few of the feedback comments left for shadygardener. You can read more about shadygardener’s feedback on ebay. If you’ve been searching for native plants, there is a good selection on ebay. But if you’d rather not purchase on ebay, you can go directly to shadygardener’s online nursery site: Shady Gardens Nursery. Plants will be promptly shipped directly to you at a great price, and if you’re looking for something not listed in the current inventory, they’ll try to find it for you!

March 4, 2009

Master Gardener Day in Georgia

Filed under: class, county, extension service, gardening, Georgia, Master Gardener, program, volunteer — shadygardens @ 4:23 pm
Master Gardener Day in Georgia is March 21, 2009. All over the state of Georgia, Master Gardeners will be celebrating the day by doing what we do best–gardening for our communities.

Many do not realize what a Master Gardener actually is. Master Gardeners are volunteers who perform a wide variety of garden-related tasks in their communities. Some help in the office, taking calls and answering questions about local garden topics. Others work closely with children in the Junior Master Gardener program. While others actually get down and get their hands dirty planting gardens in and for the community. Whether it be an ornamental garden on the town square or a vegetable garden for the needy, Master Gardeners are always around to help.

Trained by professionals provided from the University of Georgia and the local County Extension Office, Master Gardeners are a knowledgeable group of people.

If you’d like to get involved in the Master Gardener program, please contact your local County Extension Office to find out when the next course will be offered.

Blog at WordPress.com.