ShadyGardens Blog

May 23, 2009

Spring Rain is Great for the Garden!

Filed under: aspidistra, azalea, drought, Hellebore, Hellebores, Hydrangea, juniper, native, Oakleaf, Rain, rohdea, spirea, tolerant — shadygardens @ 2:22 pm

Here in Georgia we have enjoyed lots of spring rain! It has been nice to be able to plant so many additions to our garden this year. You see, for the last few years, we have been under severe drought. Summer before last, we lost every single bigleaf hydrangea we had, and they were well-established shrubs we’d had for about 10 years!

Needless to say, we’ve been planting only drought tolerant plants since then. But even drought tolerant plants need water at first to get off to a good start. And water from rain is the best! So each time rain is in the forecast, I’m out there planting again.

Our new plantings consist of the following drought tolerant plants:

  • Oakleaf Hydrangea
  • Evergreen Azaleas
  • Native Azaleas
  • Hellebores
  • Rohdea
  • Aspidistra
  • Spirea
  • Juniper

We’ve also planted a number of Camellias, since we’re getting all this rain. They’ll be drought tolerant too, once established. The photo shown was taken at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Georgia. A lake is one thing we lack here at Shady Gardens. Perhaps one day we can install one of those manmade lakes…

December 26, 2008

Drought Tolerant Plants for Georgia

Recently here in Georgia, we have received plenty of rain. For that, we are very thankful. But it is wise to make provisions for drought to return, and plant wisely when planning our gardens. Below you will find a list which includes plants we are successfully growing in our garden with no supplemental water. Some are native, some are not.
Aspidistra (Cast Iron Plant)
Callicarpa americana (Purple Beauty Berry)
Carolina Jessamine
Daphne odora (Fragrant Winter Daphne)
Hellebore (Lenten Rose)
Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf Hydrangea)
Oxalis (Wood Sorrell)
Pachysandra Procumbens
Pomegranate
Rhododendron austrinum (Florida Flame Azalea)
Rhododendron alabamense (Alabama Native Azalea)
Rohdea Japonica (Nippon Lily/Japanese Sacred Lily)
Sedums
Spirea
Wisteria frutescens (American wisteria-Not invasive!)
For more information on
any of these recommended plants, please visit Shady Gardens Nursery.

October 31, 2007

Drought Tolerant Plants for Georgia

“Average Moisture” is a term we see often on plant labels and in garden books. Many plants do well with average moisture. If only I had a garden with average moisture! It seems like our drought comes earlier each year. Our garden shows serious signs of stress, since we’re now under severe drought status. Nowadays when I search for new plants, I look for those claiming to be drought tolerant. Once again, I’m drawn to native plants—plants that occur naturally in this part of the country. Many native plants are rare plants, mostly as a result of land development for housing, shopping, and industry, but specialty nurseries have them. Georgia climate poses some problems for many plants—our summers are hot and humid. Most years we receive little rainfall. Yet our winters can be cold. Actually, it’s the extreme temperature fluctuations that cause the demise of many plants in winter here in Georgia. Native plants are accustomed to our temperature fluctuations and our drought. Believe it or not, there are some plants that grow very well in dry soil. For dry shade, look for Columbine, Perennial Geranium, Cast Iron Plant, Rohdea, Carex, Autumn Fern, and Christmas Fern. For dry sun, you’ll be rewarded by Amsonia, Asters, Yarrow, Ice plant and other succulents, Blanketflower, Perennial Sunflower, Blackeyed Susan, Ornamental Grasses, and Red Trumpet Honeysuckle. If you plant some of these drought tolerant plants, you’ll find it easier to have a beautiful garden during this Georgia drought.

Blog at WordPress.com.