ShadyGardens Blog

May 26, 2014

Memorial Day is the Day Set Aside to Remember Those Who Died for Our Country

Filed under: country, day, died, Memorial, remember — shadygardens @ 1:05 pm

Memorial Day is a Day to Remember the Brave Soldiers Who Gave Their Lives for our Freedom

Filed under: day, Memorial, remember, soldiers, Veterans — shadygardens @ 12:50 pm

April 25, 2014

Easter Lily: Poison Plant

Filed under: cats, day, Easter, lilies, lilium, Lily, plants, Poison, toxic — shadygardens @ 12:38 pm

Cat lovers, be careful about bringing home an Easter Lily. Several types of lilies are toxic to cats: Tiger Lilies, Asiatic Lilies, and other Japanese Lilies.


Easter Lily



Lilies can cause acute kidney failure when eaten by a cat. All parts are poisonous–even just a nibble of the leaf or flower can result in kidney failure. If you see your cat consuming any part of a lily plant, take him immediately to your veterinarian for emergency treatment.






Lily of the Valley




Lily of the Valley, not a true lily, is dangerous for cats too, but in a different way. Convallaria majalis, causes vomiting, diarrhea, decreased heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and possibly even seizures, when ingested.






There is some controversy about whether or not daylilies are poisonous to cats. Not a true lily, hemerocallis species are edible for humans, rabbits, and deer. Both the leaves and the flowers are delicious in salads and taste much like lettuce. 



Hemerocallis Happy Returns Daylily
The ASPCA lumps daylilies in the same category as Lilium species on the toxic plants list, but I wanted to know what scientists believe so I searched a little deeper. The Hemerocallis species does not appear on the Toxic Plant List I found. You should take a look at that list–you might be surprised to find that you have several of the plants on their list. 

Spunky spends a lot of time in the Garden
At any rate, there has apparently not been enough study done to reveal whether or not daylilies are dangerous to cats. 


I do know that some things like aspirin are fine for us to ingest but are poison for our cats. When it comes to our pets, like our children, we are responsible for their safety. When you are unsure, it is best to err on the side of caution. If your pet seems sick after eating one of your plants, take him to the vet immediately along with a sample of the plant or at least the plant name.

February 22, 2014

Arbor Day in Georgia

Filed under: arbor, day, food, Georgia, native, plants, trees, wildlife — shadygardens @ 7:40 pm
The day Arbor Day is celebrated differs from state to state due to climate differences. Georgia celebrates Arbor Day on the 3rd Friday in February. I’m running a day late, since that was yesterday. 


If you know me at all, you know I preach planting native plants, and it’s no different with trees. However, we need to take it a step further. Preserving our native birds and insects depends on planting what they need, and they need diversity.






When choosing a tree for your yard this Arbor Day, look around you. There’s no need to plant another of what you already have. Oaks are popular and they are a good tree to plant, with all those acorns for the mammals. But if you are like us, you probably have oak trees all around you. Take note of not only what you have but also what’s growing in your neighbor’s yard. Try to find something different. But native, of course. You might have to do a little research. Try doing a google search for “georgia native tree.” You could stay on the internet all day if you click every link you find.




The University of Georgia has an excellent publication on Native Plants for Georgia

There are some beautiful native trees you might not have considered. If you don’t already have one, I recommend you pick from these:

Sourwood in Fall



Sourwood, 
Oxydendrum arboreum
White fragrant summer blooms with vibrant red fall foliage. A much better choice than Burning Bush.







American Chestnut – Almost extinct, so if you find one for sale, buy it and plant it.

Red Buckeye in March



Red Buckeye
Aesculus pavia
Red panicle blooms in early Spring   develop large buckeye nuts that are food for wildlife. This tree might bloom as early as February when our Winter is mild. Looks like it will be March this year.





3 Grancy Graybeard Trees massed, Shawmut, AL







Grancy Graybeard
Chionanthus virginicus
Fragrant fluffy white blooms in early Spring with blackish drupes on female plants. Unfortunately the trees shown here were cut down to make way for the new burger joint.
We love wildlife of all kinds, pollinators, birds, and even deer and squirrels, so I consider them when I choose a new plant for our garden. We enjoy the blooms as much as the bees do, but I like to see berries, nuts, or some other kind of fruit develop later on that is not only beautiful, but food for wildlife. I hope you will also think of the birds and the bees along with furry friends when you choose what to plant for Arbor Day.

July 4, 2012

Freedom

Filed under: 4th, day, Free, Freedom, Independence, July, soldier, thank you, veteran — shadygardens @ 2:52 pm
As you celebrate Independence Day this 4th of July, remember this: 

Freedom is not free.

If you see a soldier or veteran today, remember to say Thank You.




May 26, 2012

Memorial Day: A Day to Honor those Who Fought and Died for Freedom

Filed under: day, Memorial, soldier, soldiers, veteran — shadygardens @ 1:39 pm
On this Memorial Day, let us pause for a moment of prayer in thanks for soldiers who fought and lost their life for our freedom. 


We should all remind ourselves that Freedom is not Free–it comes with a price. Thank God for those who are willing to pay that price. Also we thank God for those who are willing to take a chance, in order that freedom can be had not only in our own country but overseas as well. 


The next time you see a soldier in uniform, thank him or her for that willingness to serve our country in a world where that sacrifice is not always appreciated. 


Let the soldiers know you care.

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